This is a how-to guide on setting up CloudStack on Ubuntu and with KVM host in basic zone, basic networking but with security groups. You may do this on a VM or an actual host. This post covers setting up a CloudStack cloud on one box, which means we’ll install everything from CloudStack management server to agent to MySQL to NFS, all in one box. My motivation was to create a VM with which I can build, test Apache CloudStack (ACS) locally and show that one can do it in less than 30 minutes given ample bandwidth.

Note: this should work for ACS 4.5.0 and above. This how-to post may get outdated in future, so please read the latest docs and/or read the latest docs on KVM host installation.

First install Ubuntu 14.04 LTS x86_64 on a system that has at least 2G RAM, preferably 4GB RAM, and with a 64-bit CPU that has Intel VT-x or AMD-V enabled. I personally use VMWare Fusion which can give VMs CPU with Intel VT-x which is needed by KVM to do HVM. Too bad VirtualBox cannot do this yet, or one can say KVM cannot do paravirtualization (like Xen).

Next, we need to do bunch of things:

  • Setup networking, IPs, create bridge
  • Install cloudstack-management and cloudstack-common
  • Install and setup MySQL server
  • Setup NFS for primary and secondary storages
  • Preseed systemvm templates
  • Prepare KVM host and install cloudstack-agent
  • Configure Firewall
  • Start your cloud!

Let’s start by installing some basic packages, assuming you’re root or have sudo powers:

apt-get install openntpd openssh-server sudo vim htop tar build-essential

Make sure root is able to ssh using password, fix in /etc/ssh/sshd_config.

Reset root password and remember this password:

passwd root

Networking

Ubuntu s**ks at configuring networking, you need to reboot everytime to apply changes, and they don’t have systemd yet. Though, its Unity feels more stable than Gnome3, but then again it’s the distribution that does not even say that it’s GNU/Linux (go ahead, read their website). For good or bad reasons, it’s one of the most popular distros. Enough of trolling, let’s configure some network.

We’ll be setting up bridges and not OpenVswitch because I like bridges and they seem to work for people for several years now. CloudStack requires that KVM hosts have two bridges cloudbr0 and cloudbr1 which is because these names are sort of hard coded in the code and on the KVM host we need to have a way to let VMs communicate to the host, between themselves and reach the outside world etc. Add network rules and configure IPs as applicable.

apt-get install bridge-utils

cat /etc/network/interfaces # an example bridge configuration

auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

auto eth0
iface eth0 inet manual

# Public network
auto cloudbr0
iface cloudbr0 inet static
    address 172.16.154.10
    netmask 255.255.255.0
    gateway 172.16.154.2
    dns-nameservers 172.16.154.2 8.8.8.8
    bridge_ports eth0
    bridge_fd 5
    bridge_stp off
    bridge_maxwait 1

# Private network
auto cloudbr1
iface cloudbr1 inet manual
    bridge_ports none
    bridge_fd 5
    bridge_stp off
    bridge_maxwait 1

Notice, we’re not using cloudbr1 because the intention is to setup basic zone, basic networking, so all networking going through one bridge only.

We’re done with setting up networking, just note the cloudbr0 IP. In my case, it was 172.16.154.10. You may notice that we’re not configuring eth0 at all, it’s because we’ve a bridge now and we expose this bridge to the outside networking using this cloudbr0’s IP. By removing IP from eth0 (static or dhcp), we get ubuntu to use cloudbr0 as its default interface and use cloudbr0’s gateway as its default gateway and route. Silly Ubuntu, you need to reboot your VM or host now.

Management server and MySQL

Setup CloudStack repo, you may use something that I host (the link is unreliable, let me know if it stops working for you). You may use any other debian repo as well. One can also build from source and host their own repositories.

We need to install the CloudStack management server, MySQL server and setup the management server database:

echo deb http://packages.shapeblue.com/cloudstack/upstream/debian/4.5 / >> /etc/apt/sources.list.d/acs.list
apt-get update -y
apt-get install cloudstack-management cloudstack-common mysql-server
# pick any suitable root password for MySQL server

You don’t need to explicitly install cloudstack-common because the management package depends on it. This is to point out that many tools, scripts can be found in this package, such as tools to setup database, preseed systemvm template etc.

You may put following rules on your /etc/mysql/my.cnf, they are mostly to configure innodb settings and have MySQL use the bin-log “ROW” format which can be useful for replication etc. Since we’re doing only test setup we may skip this, even though CloudStack docs say that you put only this but I think on production systems you may need to configure many more options (perhaps 400 of those).

[mysqld]
innodb_rollback_on_timeout=1
innodb_lock_wait_timeout=600
max_connections=350
log-bin=mysql-bin
binlog-format = 'ROW'

Now, let’s setup managment server database;

service mysql restart
cloudstack-setup-databases cloud:cloudpassword@localhost --deploy-as=root:passwordOfRoot -i <stick your cloudbr0 IP here>

Storage

We’ll setup NFS and preseed systemvm.

mkdir -p /export/primary /export/secondary
apt-get install nfs-kernel-server quota
echo /export  *(rw,async,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check) > /etc/exports
exportfs -a
sed -i -e 's/^RPCMOUNTDOPTS="--manage-gids"$/RPCMOUNTDOPTS="-p 892 --manage-gids"/g' /etc/default/nfs-kernel-server
sed -i -e 's/^NEED_STATD=$/NEED_STATD=yes/g' /etc/default/nfs-common
sed -i -e 's/^STATDOPTS=$/STATDOPTS="--port 662 --outgoing-port 2020"/g' /etc/default/nfs-common
sed -i -e 's/^RPCRQUOTADOPTS=$/RPCRQUOTADOPTS="-p 875"/g' /etc/default/quota
service nfs-kernel-server restart

I prefer to download the systemvm first and then preseed it:

wget http://packages.shapeblue.com/systemvmtemplate/4.5/4.5.2/systemvm64template-4.5-kvm.qcow2.bz2
/usr/share/cloudstack-common/scripts/storage/secondary/cloud-install-sys-tmplt \
          -m /export/secondary -f systemvm64template-4.5-kvm.qcow2.bz2 -h kvm \
          -o localhost -r cloud -d cloudpassword

KVM and agent setup

Time to setup cloudstack-agent, libvirt and KVM:

apt-get install qemu-kvm cloudstack-agent
sed -i -e 's/listen_tls = 1/listen_tls = 0/g' /etc/libvirt/libvirtd.conf
echo 'listen_tcp=1' >> /etc/libvirt/libvirtd.conf
echo 'tcp_port = "16509"' >> /etc/libvirt/libvirtd.conf
echo 'mdns_adv = 0' >> /etc/libvirt/libvirtd.conf
echo 'auth_tcp = "none"' >> /etc/libvirt/libvirtd.conf
sed -i -e 's/\# vnc_listen.*$/vnc_listen = "0.0.0.0"/g' /etc/libvirt/qemu.conf
sed -i -e 's/libvirtd_opts="-d"/libvirtd_opts="-d -l"/' /etc/init/libvirt-bin.conf
service libvirt-bin restart

Firewall

Finally punch in holes on the firewall, free ‘em ports, substitute your network in the following:

# configure iptables
NETWORK=172.16.154.0/24
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p udp --dport 111 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 111 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 2049 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 32803 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p udp --dport 32769 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 892 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p udp --dport 892 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 875 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p udp --dport 875 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p tcp --dport 662 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -s $NETWORK -m state --state NEW -p udp --dport 662 -j ACCEPT

apt-get install iptables-persistent

# Disable apparmour on libvirtd
ln -s /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.libvirtd /etc/apparmor.d/disable/
ln -s /etc/apparmor.d/usr.lib.libvirt.virt-aa-helper /etc/apparmor.d/disable/
apparmor_parser -R /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.libvirtd
apparmor_parser -R /etc/apparmor.d/usr.lib.libvirt.virt-aa-helper

# Silly ufw
ufw allow mysql
ufw allow proto tcp from any to any port 22
ufw allow proto tcp from any to any port 1798
ufw allow proto tcp from any to any port 16509
ufw allow proto tcp from any to any port 5900:6100
ufw allow proto tcp from any to any port 49152:49216

Launch Cloud

All set! Make sure tomcat is not running, start the agent and management server:

/etc/init.d/tomcat6 stop
/etc/init.d/cloudstack-agent start
/etc/init.d/cloudstack-management start

If all goes well, open http://cloudbr0-IP:8080/client and you’ll see the ACS login page. Use username admin and password password to log in. Now setup a basic zone, in the following steps change the IPs as applicable:

  • Pick zone name, DNS 172.16.154.2, External DNS 8.8.8.8, basic zone + SG
  • Pick pod name, gateway 172.16.154.2, netmask 255.255.255.0, IP range 172.16.154.200-250
  • Add guest network, gateway 172.16.154.2, netmask 255.255.255.0, IP range 172.16.154.100-199
  • Pick cluster name, hypervisor KVM
  • Add the KVM host, IP 172.16.154.10, user root, password whatever-the-root-password-is
  • Add primary NFS storage, IP 172.16.154.10, path /export/primary
  • Add secondary NFS storage, IP 172.16.154.10, path /export/secondary
  • Hit launch, if everything goes well launch your zone!

Keep an eye on your /var/log/cloudstack/management/management-server.log and /var/log/cloudstack/agent/agent.log for possible issues. Read the admin docs for more cloudy admin tasks. Have fun hacking your CloudStack cloud.